Marine Corps News
Marines taking care of Marines: Marine Corps Leadership Development

By | April 21, 2014

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NORFOLK, Va. (April 15, 2014) - Capt. Alissa Tarsuik, Lejeune Leadership Institute mobile training team, discusses communication techniques with fellow officers and staff noncomissioned officers at a "breakout" session during the Marine Corps Leadership Development Workshop April 15. The workshop, based on the Marine Corps Leadership Development draft order, focused on what the new order will entail and how the unit can start their own leadership development program. The new program takes a more holistic approach to development addressed by the Functional Areas of Leadership Development: Fidelity, Fighter, Fitness, Family, Finances and Future.

NORFOLK, Va. (April 15, 2014) - Capt. Alissa Tarsuik, Lejeune Leadership Institute mobile training team, discusses communication techniques with fellow officers and staff noncomissioned officers at a "breakout" session during the Marine Corps Leadership Development Workshop April 15. The workshop, based on the Marine Corps Leadership Development draft order, focused on what the new order will entail and how the unit can start their own leadership development program. The new program takes a more holistic approach to development addressed by the Functional Areas of Leadership Development: Fidelity, Fighter, Fitness, Family, Finances and Future. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Scott McAdam)


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NORFOLK, Va. (April 16, 2012) – Marine Corps University via the Lejeune Leadership Institute hosted a Marine Corps Leadership Development (MCLD) Workshop for the Marines, sailors and civilian Marines at U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command (MARFORCOM) April 15-16.

The workshop, based on the Marine Corps Leadership Development draft order, focused on what the new order will entail and how the unit can start their own leadership development program.

“We came down here to show them (MARFORCOM) what Marine Corps leadership development was about and how to start up an individual program within the unit,” said Master Gunnery Sgt. John Willis, senior enlisted advisor, Lejeune Leadership Institute. “Once they get together and decide to implement this in the Hampton Roads area, they’ll have a snap-shot of how to begin.”

According to Col. Scott Erdelatz, director, Lejeune Leadership Institute, focusing on developing the individual Marines and sailors personally and professionally improves not only their lives, but also a unit’s overall effectiveness.

“There are tremendous benefits for the unit because this is designed not just to help the individual but to help strengthen trust and cohesion in the unit,” said Erdelatz.

Erdelatz went on to point out that Marine Air Control Group 28, one of the first units to impalement the program, has already enjoyed success with the program and seen measurable increases in good trends such as meritorious awards and reenlistments and a decrease in negative trends.

The new program has some elements Marines can expect to be familiar with such as counseling, coaching and mentoring. What may be new to some is the more personally holistic approach to development addressed by the Functional Areas of Leadership Development: Fidelity, Fighter, Fitness, Family, Finances and Future.

“It’s not about paperwork, you utilize the six F’s to really understand who your Marine is, and where he or she came from and you’re creating a dynamic rapport between each other,” said Willis.

According to Erdelatz, developing the Marines and sailors using MCLD, Marines can continue to be good stewards of the Corps and ensuring the institution continues to exemplify its Corps Values of Honor, Courage and Commitment.

“When we stay focused on who we are, who we aren’t is more obvious,” said Erdelatz.

The new Marine Corps Order is scheduled for 2014 and will replace the MCO 1500.58 Marine Corps Mentoring Program.